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Posts Tagged ‘creative’

MTB in Lex?

2010/04/28 10 comments
Rest break MTB at Capitol View

My friend Ryan likes MTB, too.

During Now What Lexington, Scott Clark and I discussed the mountain bike situation in Lexington. There is currently only one recognized trail in the city, at Veterans Park. Our friends at OutrageGIS have compiled a very nice map of the park, displaying the nearly 2.5 miles of singletrack. While I am proud that there is at least one trail in our city, it is rather limited in both distance and degree of difficulty. When I lived in Louisville, I was blessed with the ability to ride from my home to the Briar Hill trail (very technical, beautiful area), or take a short drive from work to trails at Cherokee or Seneca parks. Besides Veterans, the next closest trail to Lexington is in Frankfort’s Capitol View park. It is a great trail, but hardly a convenient after-work jaunt.

In our discussion, Scott told me about the great variety of trails he experienced while living in Northern California. After a long day of work, they were a very inviting reason to get out and exercise while enjoying nature. I have heard similar testimonials from friends in Seattle and Boulder, who love where they live because of the ease to go from office to wild trail in under 30 minutes. The only thing that seems to be standing between Lexington and the enjoyment of local MTB trails is our willingness to build. So, I wrote a letter…

Hello Parks and Rec!

I participated in a QOL focus group with Jerry Hancock yesterday, and didn’t get to speak with him before I left. Jerry mentioned the desire to modernize Lexington’s park system, and I was curious if this includes plans to add new Mountain Bike trails?

During the Creative Cities Summit and Now What Lexington, Scott Clark brought to my attention that Lexington has only one MTB trail (Veterans Park), and a short, entry level one at that. I noticed that it is not even designated on your trails list.

While I am excited about the quality of life benefits brought on by the pavement-type Legacy and Town Branch trails, I think that our city would be further enhanced by the addition of at least one new off-road MTB trail. Mountain biking is very popular among the creative class, the type of people our city is seeking to attract. Similar to hikers, mountain bikers crave an intimate experience with nature, and are inclined to preserve and maintain the environments in which they ride. As Central Kentucky seeks new ways to connect citizens and visitors to our region’s natural beauty, I think we would be remiss to move forward without plans for a new MTB trail in Fayette County.

How can I help make this a reality?

-Nick

I am excited for a response from Parks and Rec as to how citizens can help add a new trail and improve the quality of life in Lexington. I think this project will be a good complement to improved nightlife options in downtown, a more appropriate variety of housing near the city’s core, better public transportation, and stronger ties between the city and its three institutions of higher education, especially from the point of view of the creative class.

So, here’s what needs to happen:

  1. Get feedback from Parks and Rec (history of MTB in Lex, market demographics, regulations)
  2. Select a site (preferably close enough to ride from downtown to trailhead, yet with beautiful and challenging terrain)
  3. Learn how to build a trail (any experts here in Lex?)
  4. Invite all our friends to ride

I am neither an expert on trail building nor the most avid mountain biker in Lexington. I’m just a guy who loves every minute I spend on two wheels, and wants to share that joy with others. Will you help me?

==update 5/7/10==

The digging was worth it! Got some excellent news back from LFUCG and Pedal Power. In addition to upgrades to Veterans Park, construction is underway on a new trail in Scott County. Details from LFUCG:

Nick,

Thank you for your interest in mountain biking in Fayette County and Veterans Park.

The MB trails at Veterans developed unofficially over the years and are not designed to recognized safety and sustainability standards. Therefore, we didn’t feel it was prudent to “sanction” their use officially.

However, we currently have a contract with CDP Engineering to re-design the trail(s) and expand them to include 4 levels of difficulty as per national mb standards. We’ve had 2 public meetings which were heavily attended by members of the local chapter of the National Mountain Bike Association.

Using input from the association members and that of general public novice riders who also attended the meetings, we developed the attached plan. We are in the final stages of revision to a couple sections and working toward advertising bids for construction very soon.

We anticipate that current available funds will only cover the initial construction of the trail surface (and we won’t be sure how much until bids come in). We have talked to many local mountain bikers about organizing volunteer work groups to build many of the “events” along the more difficult trails once the trails are in place.

Joining KYMBA would provide a means for you to be updated about all mountain biking activities in the surrounding area. Here is a link to their website http://www.kymba.org

You can also watch this website for information about all types of local biking events, planning, advocacy and volunteer opportunities: http://www.bikelexington.com

I hope this information is helpful. Please don’t hesitate to contact me again if you have questions.

Michelle Kosieniak, RLA
Supt. of Planning & Design
LFUCG Division of Parks and Recreation
469 Parkway Dr., Lexington, KY 40504
…a nationally accredited Parks & Recreation agency
(859) 288-2982 office
(859) 489-9759 cell
(859) 288-2999 fax
michello@lexingtonky.gov

Veterans Park MTB upgrade plan

Veterans Park MTB upgrade plan

And from Pedal Power about MTB Trail Building in Scott County:

Nick, thanks for your interest! The regional chapter of the KY Mountain Bike Association is in the process of buiding an 8-10 mile mtb trail in Scott County outside of Stamping Ground. Different groups are taking responsibility for ensuring different sections get built and Pedal Power has committed to building 2.3 miles of the total trail network with the help of our customers and other volunteers from the community. We will be out working on the trail every Sunday in May (weather permitting) from 10am-2pm. The best bet for keeping up to date is to check our shop’s page on Facebook. There is also a Google group for volunteers with some good information on it that I am sending you an invitation to join if you’d like. It’d be great to see you out one Sunday! Let me know if I missed anything or you have any further questions! -John

Check out Skull Buster trail volunteers, and their work building a new set of MTB trails in Scott County, near Stamping Ground.

Scott Co Skull Buster trail map

Scott Co Skull Buster trail map

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Forget Immigration Reform. What About Deportation Reform?

2010/03/30 Leave a comment

GE: Efficiently removing low performers, and rewarding top performers.Immigration should be a 2-way street

What is more American than the GE of Jack Welch’s heyday? I think America should follow suit, and kick out the underperformers. This will help reduce our immigration deficit with India and China. Here are the criteria for determining America’s bottom 10%:

  1. Creative output: How much have you used your brain to synthesize new works of art or solutions to problems?
  2. Health: How well have you treated you body in order to avoid preventable chronic illness? Sorry smokers and junk food aficionados, you place undue burden on our healthcare system.
  3. Involvement: Apathy killed the cat. Join a group, a church, a cult, a non-profit, a team; there’s bound to be at least two other people in this country who think kinda like you. Then, find a way to contribute to an intelligent discourse on societal issues.

Those citizens found to be in America’s bottom 10% will be exported to China and India, who have been kind enough to send us their most creative, driven, entrepreneurial people. The question is: will America’s deported underperformers be allowed in?

This satirical rant inspired by:

Please support the Startup Visa movement: http://startupvisa.com/

Why UK’s Loss Is A Good Thing For Kentucky

2010/03/28 Leave a comment

Basketball does not equal Happiness

The mood was very somber as I watched the Cats fall to West Virginia with a few dozen UK fans in a downtown Nashville sports bar. This was the basketball season that induced feelings of regret that my graduation (and lost access to $5 lower-level tickets) may have been premature. After half a decade of lackluster basketball seasons, this team full of Diaper Dandies was supposed to be the one that led Kentucky back to the Final Four. I have noticed a markedly positive hue added to the demeanor of Kentuckians during the past few months, and have attributed it to the success of our most prominent sports team.

But tonight signaled the deterioration of our happiness crutch. And that is far from being a bad thing. A crutch is an artificial support. It holds us up when we are too weak to do so on our own. But in this case, we are NOT too weak. In fact, we Lexingtonians are strong beyond our own belief, but we have become accustomed to relying on the success of five guys with numbers on their backs as the source of our happiness. The problem with this situation does not lie with the players or coaches of UK’s basketball team. They have worked their tails off, augmenting athletic ability with creative approaches to defeating varying opponents. The problem lies in us, the fans. Our energetic cheers and free-throw hand-signage rituals have ZERO cause-effect relationship to the game. Because of this, we as fans have no right to fully relish in the joy of victory or agony of defeat at the same carnal level as those players directly involved in the game. If we continue to derive our happiness from the actions of others, the disappointment felt now by Cat Nation will continue to proliferate. But there is a solution, and that is to create.

Sitting on page 182 of Richard Florida’s “The Rise of the Creative Class“, my opinions of the effects of individual creativity on local economies are likely quite skewed. Yet, the recent athletic disappointment seems to be an excellent application for the empowering nature of human creativity. Whether or not we make use of it, all people are privileged with the ability to innovate, to bring into being useful and beautiful ideas that had not previously existed. Just as John Wall’s paint brush is a basketball, I have several friends who produce their artwork with soldering irons or Objective-C computer code. As every individual is capable of exercising creativity, we no longer have to outsource the production of our happiness. Following a few basic assumptions (that people prefer to be happy, and that they have free will), I am excited that UK’s earlier-than-expected exit from the NCAA tournament will mark the elimination of one distraction from my self-production of happiness. Are you willing to join me, Lexington?

Following Saturday’s MobileX conference in Nashville, I had the chance to converse with a presenter from the event who is a somewhat recent transplant from Kentucky to Texas. This has afforded him a newly external perspective to the ecosystem of the Commonwealth, and the familiarity with a few Midwest locales for use as benchmarks. I was intrigued when he noted, “Everyone feels like they’re second-best. Dallas is a huge city, and the tech community there wishes they could be as good as Austin. When I lived in Oklahoma City, their tech community was really starting to flourish, but they still felt inferior to Dallas.”

The quote endowed to us by Eleanor Roosevelt might have been more insightful than I have previously realized. “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” While frequently used to exemplify strength in the face of an opressor, in these cases, the inferiority complex is not necessarily pushed by the Austins, Bostons, Seattles, or San Franciscos. We “uncreative cities” pull this veil of inadequacy over ourselves. We deem ourselves to be second cities, when in fact we are just other cities.

Nashville is a perfect example of how to avoid this self-loathing slope. While the city’s skyline might not be laced with the logos of Microsoft, Apple, and Google, it is THE Music City. I met several seemingly small-name developers who have created hugely popular applications for country music superstars and massive events like Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza. No, they aren’t creating the next overhyped location-based game or laggy augmented reality demo. They are writing apps that appropriately serve a market that Nashville knows very well: music fans. This is an excellent model for “the third coast” to understand: build what you know.

By embracing the unique character held by our own regions, residents of cities like Lexington, Omaha, and Oklahoma City can tap into existing networks of expertise to achieve success in long-tail innovation. This will enable us to control our own destiny, and to create our own happiness. Once this is achieved, we fans can enjoy spectator sports as intended: a supplemental source of entertainment,  not a solitary source of happiness.